Want Career Success? Toss out Old Stories

A career success consultant whose blogs I follow, Kathy Caprino, wrote “How Authenticity Can Prevent Professionals From Growing Into Leaders”. I hit upon a paragraph quoted by Herminia Ibarra, author of Act Like a Leader, Think Like a Leader that knocked me over:

Don’t stick to your story. Most of us have stories about critical events in our lives that shaped who we are today and taught us important lessons. Consciously or not, we allow our stories… to guide us in new situations. But our stories can become outdated as we grow our skills and styles, so occasionally it’s necessary to alter them dramatically or even throw them out and start from scratch.

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Not only was I surprised to read something original and fresh, I could feel the light bulb switch on above my head.

We not only allow old stories to guide us in the present, we run the risk of letting those stories define who we will be in the future.

And that my friends, can have a huge impact on your career success!

There’s two reasons I’m excited about this idea. First, I went through a tough period and after two years, a coach colleague of mine asked why I was letting my story define me? Why indeed! It was time to shed the crazy narrative I was clinging to. And quite frankly, it wasn’t doing anything except hold me back. At that moment I realized I’m the one that gets to create my own narrative.

I also learned the stories that got us here will not, I repeat, not get us to where we want to go. Think of the snake that sheds its skin in order to live and thrive. So too must we let go of the stories we tell ourselves, the beliefs that no longer serve us and the tried and not always true behaviours and approaches we’ve clung to.

There’s no place more important to adopt this perspective than in our careers. I work with many new senior leaders. The absolute one thing they share is the idea that what got them to where they are right now will definitely not get them to where they want to go. In fact, it’s unlikely they’ll be successful in their leadership if they don’t shed their skin. More often than not, this is what brings them to seek a coach.

Even the most accomplished leaders get caught up with their old stories and history, allowing these to blind them to what’s really going on in the present moment.

I worked with a client who’d lost her job months earlier. The story she told herself was about being victimized by her Board of Director’s mismanagement. She  saw no other options than to be an Executive Director. She so identified with her story, she believed her only way forward was to vindicate and prove herself worthy of leading a similar organization.

We deconstructed her story and separated her emotions from the events. Through lots of work, she eventually realized her version of the story was holding her back from being open to a world of new opportunities. So powerful was this awareness that she ceremoniously let go of the old narrative. She’s since moved on to a whole new career based.

We all have the tendency toward a one-dimensional view, especially with events that have strong emotions attached. Holding our view long after the story is over can be a way of justifying our actions, soothing our fraught emotions or simply a way of making sense of a confusing or difficult situation.

Here’s the difference between a perspective based on what’s current and one that’s manufactured through the past, our emotions and imagination. A healthy perspective has us open to possibilities and unlimited ways of seeing things. It  offers a respectful way of engaging with other colleagues and making good decisions. Ultimately, with old stories left in the past, our burdens can be lifted and we can be present and wholehearted.

How can you leave behind your old stories? I suggest these four practices:

  1. Begin by realizing you may be showing up with tainted lenses from your past – good or bad. Is there one particular story that’s emotionally charged when you think about it? One that still doesn’t make sense or one that you still talk about all these years later?
  2. Revisit each story one last time. Hold it up like a globe and look at it from different vantage points. See it through the lens of others and you’ll likely discover aspects of your story that weren’t quite as you’d imagined or believed them to be.
  3. Notice how the story may be getting in your way. It happened, it’s over. Be compassionate with yourself. Take one key learning from the story and let the rest fall away. You may even find it useful to symbolically let the story go by setting free a balloon or throwing a stone in the ocean.
  4. Hold the value of the learning close, tapping into it when you find yourself slipping into the past. The learning is all that matters and all that should influence your present and future.

As for me, I’m learning to not give someone trust without it being earned. I rarely think about the old story. It’s been shed. Since then, it’s not that my world has opened up, rather it’s that I’ve opened up to my world!

What stories are holding you back from career success?

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Comments (6)

  • Avatar

    Jamee Tenzer

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    How we allow our stories to define our future is such a powerful concept and an important idea to pursue. You’ve got me thinking about my stories Eve!!

    Reply

    • Avatar

      Eve

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      excellent! and here’s the thing. we do have the power to go back and honestly assess the events and emotions from a wiser more emotionally stable place, and if warranted, put those stories on a shelf marked “the past”

      Reply

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    S. Brooke Bailey

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    I love your tips. Especially looking at the story as if it were a clear globe, from all sides, and choosing one key learning and then letting it go. It’s so important to let go of perceived restrictions and open ourselves up to the world – very encouraging – thanks Eve!

    Reply

  • Avatar

    Eve

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    You’re welcome Brooke!

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    Veronica

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    So much of what you say resonates with me not only in terms of my career, but in my life in its totality. Thank you for always challenging my thought processes.

    Reply

    • Avatar

      Eve

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      And we have to accept that our assumptions and emotions that occurred in our old stories were what we were capable of at the time. This is where hindsight can be so useful. Thanks for sharing Veronica

      Reply

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